Archives for 2019

Dr. Grant Botker provides coverage to Sanford Wheaton Hospital & Clinic

Ortonville Area Health Services is pleased to announce that Northside Medical Clinic Physician Partners have signed an agreement to provide Physician coverage in the Sanford Wheaton Hospital & Clinic one day per week beginning in January. “We are pleased to put our good fortune in recruiting physicians to our area to good use in helping out our neighbors to the north,” said OAHS CEO David Rogers. Dr. Botker will begin outreaching there in January.
His addition will further improve access to care. Botker received his medical degree from the University of Minnesota. He completed his residency in family medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Ore. He is board-certified in family medicine by the American Board of Family Medicine. He also completed an obstetrics fellowship at Altru Health Systems in Grand Forks, ND.
He specializes in family medicine, including prenatal care for OB patients.
Dr. Botker will see patients at Sanford Wheaton Clinic and is accepting new patients. Please call 320-563-8226 to schedule an appointment.

Dr. Amanda McMahon Joins Ortonville Area Health Services

Ortonville Area Health Services (OAHS) is pleased to announce that Amanda McMahon, MD has joined Northside Medical Clinic and will begin seeing patients in January.

“We are very excited to welcome Dr. McMahon to the provider group and medical team here at OAHS,” said Clinic Director Liz Sorenson. “She has a strong passion & understanding of what it takes to provide whole-person & family care. Her top-notch clinical training as a Family Practice physician will only enhance the already talented group of medical providers. We are excited that Amanda & Adam have decided to make the Big Stone Lake Area the place they want to call home and raise their family.”

Dr. McMahon received her Medical Degree in 2016 from the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Additionally, she completed her Family Medicine Residency this summer through Altru Health System in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

“My favorite part of being a doctor is being able to build relationships with my patients and their families,” said Dr. McMahon. “I am excited to be back in my hometown where I can serve my community and have the privilege of getting to know my patients on a more personal level to provide the best health care possible.”

 

For more information on Ortonville Area Health Services or to schedule an appointment with Amanda McMahon, MD please contact 320-839-6157.

Choosing the Best Insurance

Health Insurance?

Every Fall, millions of Americans face the task of choosing a Health Insurance plan for the upcoming year. Choosing the best plan can be an extremely daunting task. With this in mind, we recently talked with Sally Stattelman, Clinic Nurse Manager at OAHS, to get a few tips to help you make the best choice. Thankfully, there are numerous resources available to help guide you through the process. If you have questions or are looking for assistance in choosing a Health Insurance plan, make sure to check out the list of resources that are linked below.OAHS Patient Financial Services – 320-839-4096Senior LinkAge Line® – (800) 333-2433Linda Kolb with Prairie Five – MNSure Navigator and Counselor – 320-839-2111

Posted by Ortonville Area Health Services on Thursday, October 24, 2019

 

Every Fall, millions of Americans face the task of choosing a Health Insurance plan for the upcoming year. Choosing the best plan can be an extremely daunting task. With this in mind, we recently talked with Sally Stattelman, Clinic Nurse Manager at OAHS, to get a few tips to help you make the best choice. Thankfully, there are numerous resources available to help guide you through the process. If you have questions or are looking for assistance in choosing a Health Insurance plan, make sure to check out the list of resources that are linked below.

OAHS Patient Financial Services – 320-839-4096

Senior LinkAge Line® – (800) 333-2433

Linda Kolb with Prairie Five – MNSure Navigator and Counselor – 320-839-2111

Sanford Health Network FAQs

Medicare Advantage vs Medicare Supplement

The Pros and Cons of Switching to a Medicare Advantage Plan

MDH Rural Health Team Award – OAHS Obstetrical Team

 

Maria Botker, CNS, RN, Dr. Bob Ross, and Nicole Lovgren, RN pictured holding the Rural Health Team Award at the Minnesota Rural Health Conference on June 18, 2019.

Ortonville Area Health Services (OAHS) was awarded the Minnesota Rural Health Team Award for outstanding obstetric (OB) care at the Minnesota Rural Health Conference earlier this year. At a time when many small hospitals are no longer able to offer OB care, OAHS OB/ER has collaborated with local hospitals in Minnesota and South Dakota to provide high quality OB for their shared rural populations. OAHS, a Critical Access Hospital, is located on the border of Minnesota and South Dakota. Appointments are shared between facilities to fit the needs of pregnant women and telehealth allows for neonatal and obstetric care available at the push of a button. These partnerships allow for OB delivery of care that addresses the unique needs of women in their own rural settings. Congratulations!

 

Click here to view the acceptance speech delivered by Maria Botker, CNS, RN

 

Rural Health Lifetime Achievement Award – Dr. Robert Ross

Dr. Bob Ross, with grandson Cane, pictured holding the Rural Health Lifetime Achievement Award at the Minnesota Rural Health Conference on June 18, 2019.

 

Dr. Bob was the recipient of the 2019 Rural Health Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Bob joined the Ortonville medical staff in 1977 and hasn’t sat still since. In 1989, Dr. Bob and his partners formed the Big Stone Health Care Foundation. The Foundation, along with Dr. Bob and the entire Board’s vision, has provided health care opportunities to our community that otherwise would not have been possible. We thank Dr. Bob, his wife Mary, and their entire family for the sacrifices that have been made in order for him to be one of the leaders for his partners, the staff, and most importantly his patients. Congratulations, Dr. Bob!

Click here to read about Dr. Bob’s lifetime of success.

Click here to view Dr. Bob’s acceptance speech. 

 

Man Flu Outbreak

The Pulse Episode 1 – Sara Tollakson

The Pulse is a weekly segment where we sit down with OAHS staff members to learn more about the latest local healthcare news and some of the wonderful things they do on a daily basis. This week we sat down with OAHS Health Coach, Sara Tollakson, to learn more about her role as a health coach and the services she and her team provide.

 

National Nutrition Month continues with… Healthy Eating on the Run: A Month of Tips!

Oftentimes, people are looking for fast, easy and good-tasting foods to fit a busy lifestyle. Whether it’s carry-out, food court, office cafeteria or sit-down restaurant, there are smart choices everywhere. Here are 30 tips to help

you eat healthy when eating out.

 

  1. Think ahead and plan where you will eat. Consider what meal options are available. Look for restaurants or carry-out with a wide range of menu items.
  2. Take time to look over the menu and make careful selections. Some restaurant menus may have a special section for “healthier” choices.
  3. Read restaurant menus carefully for clues to fat and calorie content. Menu terms that can mean less fat and calories: baked, braised, broiled, grilled, poached, roasted, steamed.
  4. Menu terms that can mean more fat and calories: batter-fried, pan-fried, buttered, creamed, crispy, breaded. Choose these foods only occasionally and in small portions.
  5. Order the regular or child-size portion. Mega-sized servings are probably more than you need. For a lighter meal, order an appetizer in place of a main course.
  6. It’s OK to make special requests, just keep them simple. For example, ask for a baked potato or side salad in place of French fries; no mayonnaise or bacon on your sandwich; sauces served on the side.
  7. Hunger can drive you to eat too much bread before your meal arrives. Hold the bread or chips until your meal is served. Out of sight, out of mind.
  8. Think about your food choices for the entire day. If you’re planning a special restaurant meal in the evening, have a light breakfast and lunch.
  9. Limit the amount of alcohol you drink. No more than one drink for women and two for men. Alcohol tends to increase your appetite and provides calories without any nutrients.
  10. Tempted by sweet, creamy desserts? Order one dessert with enough forks for everyone at the table to have a bite.
  11. Split your order. Share an extra large sandwich or main course with a friend or take half home for another meal.
  12. Boost the nutrition in all types of sandwiches by adding tomato, lettuce, peppers or other vegetables.
  13. A baked potato offers more fiber, fewer calories and less fat than fries if you skip the sour cream and butter. Top your potato with broccoli and a sprinkle of cheese or salsa.
  14. At the sandwich shop, choose lean beef, ham, turkey or chicken on whole grain bread. Ask for mustard, ketchup, salsa or lowfat spreads. And, don’t forget the veggies.
  15. In place of fries or chips, choose a side salad, fruit or baked potato. Or, share a regular order of fries with a friend.
  16. Enjoy ethnic foods such as Chinese stirfry, vegetable-stuffed pita or Mexican fajitas. Go easy on the sour cream, cheese and guacamole.
  17. At the salad bar, pile on the dark leafy greens, carrots, peppers and other fresh vegetables. Lighten up on mayonnaise-based salads and high-fat toppings. Enjoy fresh fruit as your dessert.
  18. Eat your lower-calorie food first. Soup or salad is a good choice. Follow up with a light main course.
  19. Ask for sauces, dressings and toppings to be served “on the side.” Then you control how much you eat.
  20. Pass up all-you-can-eat specials, buffets and unlimited salad bars if you tend to eat too much.
  21. If you do choose the buffet, fill up on salads and vegetables first. Take no more than two trips and use the small plate that holds less food.
  22. Load up your pizza with vegetable toppings. If you add meat, make it lean ham, Canadian bacon, chicken or shrimp.
  23. Look for a sandwich wrap in a soft tortilla. Fillings such as rice mixed with seafood, chicken, or grilled vegetables are usually lower in fat and calories.
  24. Build a better breakfast sandwich: replace bacon or sausage with Canadian bacon or ham and order your sandwich on a whole grain English muffin or bagel.
  25. Be size-wise about muffins, bagels, croissants and biscuits. A jumbo muffin has more than twice the fat and calories of the regular size.
  26. Try a smoothie made with juice, fruit and yogurt for a light lunch or snack.
  27. Refrigerate carry-out or leftovers if the food won’t be eaten right away. Toss foods kept at room temperature for more than two hours.
  28. Grabbing dinner at the supermarket deli? Select rotisserie chicken, salad-in-a-bag and freshly baked bread. Or, try sliced lean roast beef, onion rolls, potato salad and fresh fruit.
  29. Always eating on the go? Tuck portable, nonperishable foods in your purse, tote, briefcase or backpack for an on-the-run meal. Some suggestions are peanut butter and crackers, granola bars, a piece of fresh fruit, trail mix, single serve packages of whole grain cereal or crackers.
  30. For desk-top dining, keep single-serve packages of crackers, fruit, peanut butter, soup, or tuna in your desk for a quick lunch.

 

Amanda Berckes, MS, RD, LN
Registered Dietitian
Ortonville Area Health Services
(320) 487-4385
www.oahs.us


Authored by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitian nutritionists. 
Source: Finding Your Way to a Healthier You, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U. S. Department of Agriculture.

 

Happy National Nutrition Month!

Did you know that only 1 in 10 adults meet the federal fruit or vegetable recommendations?

Federal guidelines recommend that adults eat at least 1½ to 2 cups per day of fruit and 2 to 3 cups per day of vegetables as part of a healthy eating pattern. Yet in 2015, only 9% of U.S. adults met the intake recommendations for vegetables and 12% of adults met the recommendations for fruit.  These numbers were even lower in Minnesota – only 8.1% of MN adults met the recommendations for vegetables and 11.6% met the recommendations for fruit.

 

Here are some tips to increase vegetable intake:

  • Buy fresh vegetables in season. They cost less and are likely to be at their peak flavor.
  • Stock up on frozen vegetables for quick and easy cooking in the microwave.
  • Buy vegetables that are easy to prepare. Pick up pre-washed bags of salad greens and add baby carrots or grape tomatoes for a salad in minutes. Buy packages of veggies such as baby carrots or celery sticks for quick snacks.
  • Use a microwave to quickly “zap” vegetables. White or sweet potatoes can be baked quickly this way.
  • Vary your veggie choices to keep meals interesting.
  • Buy canned vegetables labeled “reduced sodium,” “low sodium,” or “no salt added.”
  • Keep a bowl of cut-up vegetables in a see-through container in the refrigerator. Carrot and celery sticks are traditional, but consider red or green pepper strips, broccoli florets, or cucumber slices.

At meals:

  • Plan some meals around a vegetable main dish, such as a vegetable stir-fry or soup. Then add other foods to complement it.
  • Try a main dish salad for lunch. Go light on the salad dressing.
  • Include a green salad with your dinner every night.
  • Shred carrots or zucchini into meatloaf, casseroles, quick breads, and muffins.
  • Include chopped vegetables in pasta sauce or lasagna.
  • Order a veggie pizza with toppings like mushrooms, green peppers, and onions, and ask for extra veggies.
  • Use pureed, cooked vegetables such as squash to thicken stews, soups and gravies. These add flavor, nutrients, and texture.
  • Grill vegetable kabobs as part of a barbecue meal. Try tomatoes, mushrooms, green peppers, and onions.

 

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6645a1.htm?s_cid=mm6645a1_w

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/vegetables-tips

 

Amanda Berckes, MS, RD, LN
Registered Dietitian
Ortonville Area Health Services
(320) 487-4385
www.oahs.us

2018 Stork Review

March Is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer Screening Saves Lives

Colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer in the U.S. But it can be prevented. Screening helps find precancerous polyps so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. Screening can also find colorectal cancer early, when treatment is most effective.

Facts about colon and rectal cancer:

  1. In 2019, an estimated 2,300 Minnesotans will be diagnosed and 790 Minnesotans may die from colorectal cancer.
  2. One in 23 Americans will be diagnosed with colon cancer in their lifetime, one in five of those will be diagnosed under the age of 54.
  3. The American Cancer Society recommends that screening for this preventable cancer should begin at age 45 for adults with average risk. Screening should begin earlier for individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps.
  4. In Minnesota the screening rate for colorectal cancer sits at 73.7%, increasing that by just one percentage point could mean an additional 10,000 Minnesotans would be screened, saving lives in the process.

What can be done to reduce the risk?

  1. Get screened as recommended, starting at age 45, or earlier for those with certain risk factors.
  2. Maintain a healthy weight, and adopt a physically active lifestyle.
  3. Understand the symptoms, and talk with your doctor if you experience blood in your stool, chronic constipation or unexplained weight loss.
  4. Consume a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, while limiting red and processed meats.
  5. Limit your alcohol consumption and don’t smoke.

 

If you’re 50 or older-don’t wait. Talk to your doctor and get screened.
Call 320-839-6157 for an appointment or if you have questions.

February is Heart Health Month – Let’s Talk About Cholesterol

Managing cholesterol early in life is key to lowering your risk for heart disease. Here are 4 ways to take control of your cholesterol levels today. #HeartMonth http://bit.ly/2DLXXMZExternal

 

 

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