2019 Christmas Baby

It was a very special Christmas for OAHS and Kayla & Josh as they welcomed Lynken Zachary, the OAHS 2019 Christmas baby. Lynken Zachary was born December 27th at 4:10am weighing 7lbs 13oz and measuring 20″. Lynken joins siblings Joshua (15), Ashton (14), Treshawn (11), and Brianna (9).

Dr. Grant Botker provides coverage to Sanford Wheaton Hospital & Clinic

Ortonville Area Health Services is pleased to announce that Northside Medical Clinic Physician Partners have signed an agreement to provide Physician coverage in the Sanford Wheaton Hospital & Clinic one day per week beginning in January. “We are pleased to put our good fortune in recruiting physicians to our area to good use in helping out our neighbors to the north,” said OAHS CEO David Rogers. Dr. Botker will begin outreaching there in January.
His addition will further improve access to care. Botker received his medical degree from the University of Minnesota. He completed his residency in family medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Ore. He is board-certified in family medicine by the American Board of Family Medicine. He also completed an obstetrics fellowship at Altru Health Systems in Grand Forks, ND.
He specializes in family medicine, including prenatal care for OB patients.
Dr. Botker will see patients at Sanford Wheaton Clinic and is accepting new patients. Please call 320-563-8226 to schedule an appointment.

Dr. Amanda McMahon Joins Ortonville Area Health Services

Ortonville Area Health Services (OAHS) is pleased to announce that Amanda McMahon, MD has joined Northside Medical Clinic and will begin seeing patients in January.

“We are very excited to welcome Dr. McMahon to the provider group and medical team here at OAHS,” said Clinic Director Liz Sorenson. “She has a strong passion & understanding of what it takes to provide whole-person & family care. Her top-notch clinical training as a Family Practice physician will only enhance the already talented group of medical providers. We are excited that Amanda & Adam have decided to make the Big Stone Lake Area the place they want to call home and raise their family.”

Dr. McMahon received her Medical Degree in 2016 from the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Additionally, she completed her Family Medicine Residency this summer through Altru Health System in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

“My favorite part of being a doctor is being able to build relationships with my patients and their families,” said Dr. McMahon. “I am excited to be back in my hometown where I can serve my community and have the privilege of getting to know my patients on a more personal level to provide the best health care possible.”

 

For more information on Ortonville Area Health Services or to schedule an appointment with Amanda McMahon, MD please contact 320-839-6157.

Choosing the Best Insurance

Health Insurance?

Every Fall, millions of Americans face the task of choosing a Health Insurance plan for the upcoming year. Choosing the best plan can be an extremely daunting task. With this in mind, we recently talked with Sally Stattelman, Clinic Nurse Manager at OAHS, to get a few tips to help you make the best choice. Thankfully, there are numerous resources available to help guide you through the process. If you have questions or are looking for assistance in choosing a Health Insurance plan, make sure to check out the list of resources that are linked below.OAHS Patient Financial Services – 320-839-4096Senior LinkAge Line® – (800) 333-2433Linda Kolb with Prairie Five – MNSure Navigator and Counselor – 320-839-2111

Posted by Ortonville Area Health Services on Thursday, October 24, 2019

 

Every Fall, millions of Americans face the task of choosing a Health Insurance plan for the upcoming year. Choosing the best plan can be an extremely daunting task. With this in mind, we recently talked with Sally Stattelman, Clinic Nurse Manager at OAHS, to get a few tips to help you make the best choice. Thankfully, there are numerous resources available to help guide you through the process. If you have questions or are looking for assistance in choosing a Health Insurance plan, make sure to check out the list of resources that are linked below.

OAHS Patient Financial Services – 320-839-4096

Senior LinkAge Line® – (800) 333-2433

Linda Kolb with Prairie Five – MNSure Navigator and Counselor – 320-839-2111

Sanford Health Network FAQs

Medicare Advantage vs Medicare Supplement

The Pros and Cons of Switching to a Medicare Advantage Plan

MDH Rural Health Team Award – OAHS Obstetrical Team

 

Maria Botker, CNS, RN, Dr. Bob Ross, and Nicole Lovgren, RN pictured holding the Rural Health Team Award at the Minnesota Rural Health Conference on June 18, 2019.

Ortonville Area Health Services (OAHS) was awarded the Minnesota Rural Health Team Award for outstanding obstetric (OB) care at the Minnesota Rural Health Conference earlier this year. At a time when many small hospitals are no longer able to offer OB care, OAHS OB/ER has collaborated with local hospitals in Minnesota and South Dakota to provide high quality OB for their shared rural populations. OAHS, a Critical Access Hospital, is located on the border of Minnesota and South Dakota. Appointments are shared between facilities to fit the needs of pregnant women and telehealth allows for neonatal and obstetric care available at the push of a button. These partnerships allow for OB delivery of care that addresses the unique needs of women in their own rural settings. Congratulations!

 

Click here to view the acceptance speech delivered by Maria Botker, CNS, RN

 

Rural Health Lifetime Achievement Award – Dr. Robert Ross

Dr. Bob Ross, with grandson Cane, pictured holding the Rural Health Lifetime Achievement Award at the Minnesota Rural Health Conference on June 18, 2019.

 

Dr. Bob was the recipient of the 2019 Rural Health Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Bob joined the Ortonville medical staff in 1977 and hasn’t sat still since. In 1989, Dr. Bob and his partners formed the Big Stone Health Care Foundation. The Foundation, along with Dr. Bob and the entire Board’s vision, has provided health care opportunities to our community that otherwise would not have been possible. We thank Dr. Bob, his wife Mary, and their entire family for the sacrifices that have been made in order for him to be one of the leaders for his partners, the staff, and most importantly his patients. Congratulations, Dr. Bob!

Click here to read about Dr. Bob’s lifetime of success.

Click here to view Dr. Bob’s acceptance speech. 

 

June Surplus Items

Surplus Sale Items

 

Health Careers Camp – June 19th

Lab Promotions 2019

Man Flu Outbreak

The Pulse Episode 1 – Sara Tollakson

The Pulse is a weekly segment where we sit down with OAHS staff members to learn more about the latest local healthcare news and some of the wonderful things they do on a daily basis. This week we sat down with OAHS Health Coach, Sara Tollakson, to learn more about her role as a health coach and the services she and her team provide.

 

19 Health Tips for 2019.

National Nutrition Month may be ending in a week, but healthy habits should be made year-round!

Here are 19 Health Tips for 2019.

  1. Eat Breakfast

Start your morning with a healthy breakfast that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Try making a breakfast burrito with scrambled eggs, low-fat cheese, salsa and a whole wheat tortilla or a parfait with low-fat plain yogurt, fruit and whole grain cereal.

 

  1. Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and veggies add color, flavor and texture plus vitamins, minerals and fiber to your plate. Make 2 cups of fruit and 2 ½ cups of vegetables your daily goal. Experiment with different types, including fresh, frozen and canned.

 

  1. Watch Portion Sizes

Get out the measuring cups and see how close your portions are to the recommended serving size. Use half your plate for fruits and vegetables and the other half for grains and lean protein foods. To complete the meal, add a serving of fat-free or low-fat milk or yogurt.

 

  1. Be Active

Regular physical activity has many health benefits. Start by doing what exercise you can. Children and teens should get 60 or more minutes of physical activity per day, and adults at least two hours and 30 minutes per week. You don’t have to hit the gym—take a walk after dinner or play a game of catch or basketball.

 

  1. Get to Know Food Labels

Reading the Nutrition Facts panel can help you shop and eat or drink smarter.

 

  1. Fix Healthy Snacks

Healthy snacks can sustain your energy levels between meals, especially when they include a combination of foods. Choose from two or more of the MyPlate food groups: grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and protein. Try raw veggies with low-fat cottage cheese, or a tablespoon of peanut butter with an apple or banana.

 

  1. Consult an RDN

Whether you want to lose weight, lower your health-risks or manage a chronic disease, consult the experts! Registered dietitian nutritionists can help you by providing sound, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice.

 

  1. Follow Food Safety Guidelines

Reduce your chances of getting sick with proper food safety. This includes: regular hand washing, separating raw foods from ready-to-eat foods, cooking foods to the appropriate temperature, and refrigerating food promptly. Learn more about home food safety at www.homefoodsafetyorg.

 

  1. Drink More Water

Quench your thirst with water instead of drinks with added sugars. Stay hydrated and drink plenty of water, especially if you are active, are an older adult or live or work in hot conditions.

 

  1. Get Cooking

Preparing foods at home can be healthy, rewarding and cost-effective. Master some kitchen basics, like dicing onions or cooking dried beans. The collection of “Planning and Prep” videos at www.eatright.org/videos will get you started.

 

  1. Dine Out without Ditching Goals

You can eat out and stick to your healthy eating plan! The key is to plan ahead, ask questions and choose foods carefully. Compare nutrition information, if available, and look for healthier options that are grilled, baked, broiled or steamed.

 

  1. Enact Family Meal Time

Plan to eat as a family at least a few times each week. Set a regular mealtime. Turn off the TV, phones and other electronic devices to encourage mealtime talk. Get kids involved in meal planning and cooking and use this time to teach them about good nutrition.

 

  1. Banish Brown Bag Boredom

Whether it’s for work or school, prevent brown bag boredom with easy-to-make, healthy lunch ideas. Try a whole-wheat pita pocket with veggies and hummus or a low sodium vegetable soup with whole grain crackers or a salad of mixed greens with low-fat dressing and a hard-boiled egg.

 

  1. Reduce Added Sugars

Foods and drinks with added sugars can contribute empty calories and little or no nutrition. Review ingredients on the food label to help identify sources of added sugar. Visit www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for more information.

 

  1. Eat Seafood Twice a Week

Seafood—fish and shellfish—contains a range of nutrients including healthy omega-3 fats. Salmon, trout, oysters and sardines are higher in omega-3s and lower in mercury.

 

  1. Explore New Foods and Flavors

Add more nutrition and eating pleasure by expanding your range of food choices. When shopping, make a point of selecting a fruit, vegetable or whole grain that’s new to you or your family.

 

  1. Experiment with Plant-Based Meals

Expand variety in your menus with budget friendly meatless meals. Many recipes that use meat and poultry can be made without. Eating a variety of plant foods can help. Vegetables, beans, and lentils are all great substitutes. Try including one meatless meal per week to start.

 

  1. Make an Effort to Reduce Food Waste

Check out what foods you have on hand before stocking up at the grocery store. Plan meals based on leftovers and only buy what you will use or freeze within a couple of days. Managing these food resources at home can help save nutrients and money.

 

  1. Slow Down at Mealtime

Instead of eating on the run, try sitting down and focusing on the food you’re about to eat. Dedicating time to enjoy the taste and textures of foods can have a positive effect on your food intake.

 

 

Amanda Berckes, MS, RD, LN
Registered Dietitian
Ortonville Area Health Services
(320) 487-4385
www.oahs.us

Authored by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitian nutritionists. 
www.eatright.org.

 

 

Translate »